Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.825118
Title: How do counselling psychologists address political events in therapy? : a constructivist grounded theory
Author: Karimova, Fargana
Awarding Body: Open University
Current Institution: Regent's University London
Date of Award: 2021
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Abstract:
This thesis explores the processes involved when counselling psychologists address political events in therapy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six UK-based counselling psychologists. The interviews were analysed using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Through analysis, a complex interplay between the political and personal domains was explored. The impact of political events on subjective and intersubjective experiences and processes in therapy was highlighted. Participants' divergent attitudes towards political events in therapy were identified, such as 'actively engaging' and 'avoiding engaging'. The therapeutic process of addressing political events was conceptualised as emotionally intense and dynamic. This presents various tensions that, according to the analysis of the data, are difficult to handle. Participants' engagement with political events was dependent on factors such as their personal history, politics, subjective and intersubjective experiences, and tensions present when discussing political events in therapy. It was concluded that counselling psychologists may be less likely to engage therapeutically with clients who differ politically. They may be more likely to engage if there is a personal connection to a political event. This may present potential issues in current counselling psychology practice with political events. Several training and practice recommendations are provided to contribute to best practice in counselling psychology for addressing political events in therapy.
Supervisor: Damon, Helen Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.825118  DOI: Not available
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