Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.822648
Title: Empty categories in Denya
Author: Abangma, Samson Negbo
Awarding Body: University of London
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 1992
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Abstract:
This work presents a study of empty categories (ECs) in Denya, an Ekoid Bantu language spoken mainly in Cameroon. It is undertaken within the framework of Government Binding (GB) Theory. The study shows that the current theories of GB based mainly on the analysis of English, some European languages and Chinese/Japanese, can also be applied to Denya, an African language. The study starts by accepting the four types of ECs established by Chomsky - PRO, pro, NP-trace, wh-trace. In addition, the study looks at parasitic gaps, a phenomenon receiving considerable attention in the current literature. The thesis comprises six main chapters and a conclusion. Chapter 1 entitled ''Preliminaries" is basically introductory and deals with the goal, the scope and limitations of the work. It also includes a brief account of GB. Chapter 2 looks at PRO, the pronominal anaphor. Chapter 3 examines pro. the pure pronominal [+p, - a] EC found only in null subject languages. In the following chapter, NP-trace receives attention. In the fifth chapter our interest is taken by the wh-trace, while the sixth chapter examines the phenomenon of parasitic gaps. The work terminates in chapter 7 with a brief conclusion. Here the various threads of the discussion in the preceding chapters are drawn together, the importance of the study is suggested and indications of areas of further research are made. It is worth noting that this work makes, in a modest way, a contribution to our understanding of the principles of Universal Grammar as suggested in Chomsky (1981, 1982, 1986, 1986b). We have been able to show the extent to which the features of ECs in the language can be established by a limited number of parametric settings.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.822648  DOI: Not available
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