Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.817633
Title: Intangibles strategy, appropriability regimes and firm innovation performance
Author: Turner, Joanne Ellen
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
This thesis is positioned in light of the increasing importance of intangible assets to firms in today’s economies. The emergence of the knowledge-based economy has led to a shift towards the creation and management of knowledge assets; assets which are now widely acknowledged as a key driver of firm innovation and growth. Accordingly, there is an increasing need for firms to become concerned with strategies relating to intangible assets. Based upon firm-level data taken from the UK Community Innovation Surveys and the Business Structure Database, this thesis is comprised of three empirical chapters. Each of these chapters uses quantitative analysis which is econometric in nature to examine firms’ intangibles strategies from different perspectives. Using a series of probit and ordered-probit models, the first study examines a firm’s intangibles investment and protection behaviour, exploring how the industry appropriability regime and other elements of industry structure influence firm decisions. The study contributes to knowledge by seeking to identify whether the industry appropriability regime or some other element of industry structure drives a firm’s intangibles strategy. In addition, the analysis explores whether the effects are consistent across the different components of a firm’s intangibles strategy. Results suggest that both the industry appropriability regime and industry structure influence a firm’s intangibles investment behaviour and the importance a firm attaches to different knowledge-protection mechanisms. In contrast, industry structure is less important for a firm’s actual protection decisions, and a stronger appropriability regime is found to have a positive effect on a firm’s use of easier-to-implement protection mechanisms. The second study uses Tobit-model regressions to examine how the strength of the industry appropriability regime influences the complexity and variability of firms’ knowledge-protection strategies within an industry. The analysis adds to existing knowledge by taking a holistic view of knowledge protection and examining how the strength of the industry appropriability regime impacts upon firms’ knowledge-protection choices within an industry. Results suggest that both the complexity and variability of firms’ knowledge-protection strategies increase when the knowledge-protection dimension of the industry appropriability regime strengthens. Moreover, results further suggest that the magnitude of the effect on complexity and variability varies across different industries. In the third study, an innovation production function is estimated using a fractional-response model to investigate the relationship between a firm’s innovation performance and its orientation towards the use of formal and informal knowledge-protection mechanisms. The analysis builds upon the existing knowledge-protection literature by using data on firms’ actual use of formal and informal knowledge-protection mechanisms. In addition, the study contributes towards existing knowledge by exploring the effects of both formal and informal knowledge-protection strategies on the returns to innovation in firms of different sizes, firms with different technologies, firms in different sectors and firms innovating with different degrees of novelty. Results suggest that in general, both formal and informal knowledge-protection strategies are important for firms’ innovation returns. Furthermore, industrial context, firm size and the degree of novelty of an innovation are all found to affect the magnitude of the impact upon a firm’s innovation returns.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.817633  DOI: Not available
Keywords: HB Economic Theory ; HD Industries. Land use. Labor ; HF Commerce
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