Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.817055
Title: The British conquest and administration of Orissa, 1803-1819
Author: Ray, Bhabani Charan
Awarding Body: SOAS University of London
Current Institution: SOAS, University of London
Date of Award: 1956
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Please try the link below.
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
In this thesis an attempt is made to analyse the British conquest and administration of Orissa. Chronologically the subject covers the period between 1803 and 1819. Geographically the subject relates to that Maratha Orissa which was brought under British rule after its conquest. This work is divided into ten chapters. Chapter I deals with the British attempt to secure Orissa through diplomacy. Chapter II describes the British plan of attack and final occupation of Orissa. Chapter III outlines the British tackling of the rebellion of the Raja of Khurda. Chapter IV recounts the British policy towards some tributary states exempted from the general regulations. Chapter V narrates the British religious policy with special reference to the management of the temple of Jagannath and the collection of the pilgrim tax. Chapter VI concerns economic policy. It is subdivided into four sections. Section I shows the introduction of Cornwallis's system of revenue administration. Section II concerns the currency problem. Section III narrates the introduction of salt monopoly. Section IV concerns the administration on of the embankments. Chapter VII explains the introduction of the Bengal judicial system. Chapter VIII describes the rebellion of 1817. Chapter IX analyses the reforms which were subsequently adopted. In Chapter X an attempt is made to bring these themes together. In a particular country changes in the Government usually involve problems of adaptation, because old ideas are set aside to make room for the new ones. If a regulation is enforced suddenly or abruptly, there is the possibility of a popular reaction against it. This is shown in Chapters VI, VII and VIII. How far popular reactions helped to determine the policy of the Government is shown in Chapter IX. The work is mostly based on original official sources. Some private papers are also used.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.817055  DOI:
Share: