Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.816168
Title: Becoming a coach : the need for a sociological analysis of coaching philosophies
Author: Graham, Laura H.
ISNI:       0000 0004 9353 6110
Awarding Body: University of the West of Scotland
Current Institution: University of the West of Scotland
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
This study explores the esoteric and often bewildering conceptualisation of coach philosophies and their development. Activities encouraging coaches to reflect on their personal philosophy are rife within coach education courses but there is currently limited understanding of the boundaries and definition of the concept. Given the lack of clarity, it is unsurprising that the articulation of a philosophy is often superficial and ineffective, with little evidence of execution in practice. The aim of this study was to trace the origins and development of the philosophies of sport coaching students throughout the duration of a higher education sport coaching degree at a U.K. university between 2010 and 2013. Participants (n=77) submitted a written statement of their philosophy in the first year of study and were subsequently interviewed in both their second (n=11) and third years (n=7). Using Bourdieu’s concept of habitus as a framework, data were thematically analysed and narratives from individual participants discussed. Results demonstrated that student coaches often struggled to articulate their philosophy and value systems without support but it was clear that personal experience and significant others had exerted major influences on the shaping of their values regarding sport. Participants found reflection challenging and, while the coaches involved in the study demonstrated flexibility and evolution in their approach, they suggested they had observed many other coaches who failed to develop their practice, instead adhering rigidly to those methods by which they themselves were coached. The experiences of the novice coaches explored in the study prompt some practical recommendations for coach educators who would seek to dispel discriminatory practices and to agitate the often stagnant waters of sport culture.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.816168  DOI: Not available
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