Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.815117
Title: An information systems security framework for the e-government programme of Jordan
Author: Samara, Nadia Khaled Ali
ISNI:       0000 0004 9356 6053
Awarding Body: University of Hull
Current Institution: University of Hull
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
Any e-government programme provides e-services as one of the most important means by which the interaction between citizens, businesses and governments takes place. This has brought great opportunities but also raises serious cybersecurity challenges. Critical information assets are facing various potential security risks and threats. Information systems security is necessary to mitigate those risks and threats that are faced by the e-government programme and to safeguard the confidentiality, integrity and availability of the available e-services. In light of the above, the aim of this study is to examine how information security is managed and approached within e-government programmes and the case study of the Ministry of ICT in Jordan informs that aim. The study deconstructs information security through the Technical/Formal/Informal (TFI) framework and enriches that framework by customising it for e-government, expanding it also to include citizens’ online trust. To achieve this aim, a qualitative investigation of the Jordanian e-government programme was conducted by following the research design of a case study in the interpretivist tradition. Furthermore, a survey was used as a complementary phase to examine citizens’ perspectives on e-government security. By combining, analysing and reflecting on the empirical data, a consolidated information security framework was developed for different security aspects, based on the TFI model (technical, formal and informal). The dissertation contributes to the knowledge domain at the intersection of e-government and cybersecurity both practically and theoretically, focusing on technical aspects and non-technical aspects as well. The proposed framework provides an overview of the TFI-categorised elements that can help governments reflect on and manage the security challenges of their corresponding e-government programmes.
Supervisor: Demetis, Dionysios ; Merali, Yasmin Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.815117  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Business
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