Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.810791
Title: The contribution of complementary therapy within the care of nursing home residents experiencing later stage dementia : an action research study
Author: Mitchell, Bryan
Awarding Body: University of the West of Scotland
Current Institution: University of the West of Scotland
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
This study responds to the need for therapeutic interventions with demonstrable benefit for individuals with dementia. Current estimates suggest that there are over 90,000 people in Scotland with dementia, 40% of whom will be admitted to care homes when the condition advances. Known variations in the standard of nursing home practice and calls to develop and deliver evidence-informed advanced dementia care gave impetus to this study. In particular, an intervention was sought that had potential to positively influence the experience of care and contribute to the management of dementia-related symptoms and behaviours. The aim of this mixed-method action research study was to collaboratively introduce and explore the perceived benefits of complementary therapy as an intervention for nursing home residents with later stage dementia. The project involved two action cycles. Cycle 1 explored the views of 21 staff and family and friends on the acceptability and possible uses of complementary therapy within the care of nursing home residents with later stage dementia. Five individual case studies were undertaken to test how the introduction of selected complementary therapies could be achieved in practice and to explore the perceived contribution to residents, including impact on neuropsychiatric behaviours. The experience and practicalities of introducing complementary therapy were then reflected on with staff during a focus group and friends and family during telephone interviews. Mindful of Cycle 1 findings, Cycle 2 collaboratively developed principles of implementation with care staff that were inclusive of family. Selected complementary therapies were then implemented into practice and further tested with 10 individuals. The findings demonstrate that staff and friends and family perceive the use of complementary therapy to be supportive of an individual’s physical and emotional needs. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire used during the case study and implementation objectives indicated a reduction in neuropsychiatric behaviours related to dementia. An unexpected finding was that staff and family consider the use of complementary therapy to be an intervention that reduces a sense of loneliness. Overall, this study has provided evidence to support the use of complementary therapy for individuals with later stage dementia in a nursing home, indicating that complementary therapy has an unexpected potential as a loneliness intervention in addition to benefits associated with reduction in neuropsychiatric behaviours related to dementia. Additionally, a workable set of implementation principles has been established for the future use of complementary therapy in nursing homes. Findings have given thought to recommendations for future research, nursing home practice, education and policy.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.810791  DOI: Not available
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