Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.804657
Title: The relationship between intergenerational transfers, co-residence and labour participation among older people in Malaysia
Author: Binti Pazim, Khairul Hanim
ISNI:       0000 0004 8509 1780
Awarding Body: University of Southampton
Current Institution: University of Southampton
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
The increasing percentage of older people in many countries has aroused interest among policymakers with regard to older people’s well-being, including issues concerning support for older people, their economic security and familial and living arrangements. While some older people support themselves with their own income and savings through wealth accumulation, there are others who remain active in the labour market out of financial necessity. Some older people tend to work as long as they are physically able, especially when support from family members is limited. Using data from the Fifth Malaysian Population and Family Survey 2014 (MPFS-5), this research investigates the relationship between intergenerational transfers, co-residence and labour participation among 4,059 older Malaysians aged 60 years and above. A binary logistic regression was used to identify the significant predictors of older Malaysians participating in the labour market after controlling for key demographic, health and socio-economic, geographical and intergenerational support variables. The results showed that respondents who were older, female, and either married or widowed were less likely to participate in the labour market than their counterparts. On the other hand, those who were of Chinese background, with more income sources, who lived in rural areas and those residing in Sabah, Sarawak and Labuan were more likely to be in the labour market than their comparison groups. Furthermore, respondents with a higher education, those who experienced greater difficulty in daily living and those who lived with more health problems were less likely to be in the labour market than the reference group. In terms of intergenerational support, older people who received support from their adult children more frequently were less likely to participate in the labour market than those who received no support. Surprisingly, co-residence was not a statistically significant factor. This research has offered an insight into the complex relationship between working in later life and supporting one’s family among older people in Malaysia. These findings have important implications for Malaysian old age policy and its effort to promote productive ageing through employment opportunities, which can ensure continued independence in old age, while acknowledging the importance of family support on preserving the welfare of older people in Malaysia.
Supervisor: Evandrou, Maria Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.804657  DOI: Not available
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