Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.801171
Title: The socioeconomic effects of wars
Author: Ferrara, Andreas
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
This thesis consists of three essays at the intersection of the fields of economic history and labor economics. Using the case of the United States during the two World Wars and the Civil War, the thesis shows the unintended consequences of wars on the socioeconomic outcomes of those who stay behind especially through the channel of war deaths which disrupt labor markets, family structures, or social attitudes, among others. Chapter one studies how deaths among semi-skilled whites during World War II opened employment opportunities for African Americans from which they had been barred in the past. These improved opportunities in the labor market not led to better economic outcomes for blacks, such as wages, education, or house values, but also led to better black-white social relations such as friendships or attitudes towards integration. Chapter two uses linked Census data and information on soldiers from the U.S. CivilWar to study the effects of losing a father on the long-term effects of children. While the negative results are expected, this is one of the first studies to follow children over such a long period of time and it also provides an identification strategy based on allocation of soldiers to battles that were unexpectedly costly. The final chapter estimates the effect of discrimination against Germans in the U.S. during World War I on economic growth. Counties with higher anti-German sentiment during the war years discriminated away their German-born population at the cost of reduced economic growth. This particularly affected the manufacturing sector, a high-productivity sector with a disproportionally large share of German workers.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.801171  DOI: Not available
Keywords: D History (General) ; HC Economic History and Conditions
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