Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.800723
Title: Ecocentrist and anthropocentrist attitudes in developing and developed countries
Author: Alvarez Rodriguez, Rubi
ISNI:       0000 0004 8509 8966
Awarding Body: University of Southampton
Current Institution: University of Southampton
Date of Award: 2018
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Please try the link below.
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
This research explains what and how contextual wealth factors condition the influence of individual wealth factors on environmental attitudes in developing countries compared to developed ones. This work considers aspects of two types of attitudes, ecocentrism and anthropocentrism. The first type deems environmental protection important because nature is intrinsically valuable, while the second considers nature valuable for its utilitarian function to humans. Given that the physical proximity of human residence to environmental issues is one aspect that determines the type of attitude, and that certain national contexts are more likely to be plagued with immediate environmental problems (e.g., poor sewage and sanitation quality), individual attitudes of anthropocentrism and ecocentrism will prevail differently according to the individual’s national context. Explicitly, I argue that individual wealth positively predicts ecocentrist attitudes, and that this effect is stronger among developed-country residents, relative to residents in developing countries. On the other hand, individual wealth has a negative effect on anthropocentrist attitudes; thus, this effect is expected to be stronger among developing-country residents, relative to developed-country residents. To examine these theoretical expectations, this study uses survey data, in over thirty countries, from the World Value survey 2005-2009. The empirical analyses use standard and multilevel logistic regression modelling to assess the theoretical arguments just mentioned.
Supervisor: Jennings, William Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.800723  DOI: Not available
Share: