Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.798153
Title: Albur and sexual double meaning in Mexican Shakespearean translation
Author: Hijuelos Saldivar, Lilia
ISNI:       0000 0004 8506 650X
Awarding Body: University of York
Current Institution: University of York
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
This thesis examines the prospect of translating Shakespeare's sexual double meaning by means of the vocabulary and behavioural traits pertinent to Mexican albur - a variety of friendly verbal duel with sexual puns. Following the functionalist approach of Skopostheorie, which focuses on purpose as the primary guideline for translational action, I deliver an overview of contemporary Mexican culture and society as a way of understanding how better to fulfil the purpose of my translation, which is to successfully convey sexual double meaning as a way of bringing Mexican audiences closer to Shakespearean theatre practice. Accordingly, I provide a description of albur and its particular dynamics in Mexican culture and consider the history of Mexican Shakespeare translation, which is inevitably tied to issues of colonialism and the strong influence of early Iberian translations. I then offer commentary on some relevant examples of easily accessible translated text for which the original displays sexual double meaning. Finally, I propose my own translation of selected sections of Shakespearean sexual double meaning as proof to the potential of my approach. The theoretical ground provided by Skopostheorie allows me to pursue a fluid translational action as opposed to a finished target text, therefore encouraging diversity in translation choices and signalling a more dynamic conversation between Mexicanity and Shakespeare tradition.
Supervisor: Sheen, Erica Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.798153  DOI: Not available
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