Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.797169
Title: Depression in cancer patients : an examination of the role of self-efficacy for coping with cancer and dispositional optimism
Author: Wyne, Muttahera
Awarding Body: University of Glasgow
Current Institution: University of Glasgow
Date of Award: 2001
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Abstract:
The caseload and casemix of an area wide psychology service was compared across time to examine whether there was a proportionate increase of Reasons For Care within the caseload which were more demanding of time in general. All the referrals received by the service during two 18-month cohorts were compared in terms of client problem. Care Aim and time in contact. The overall number of referrals received by the service in Cohort Two had increased. The proportionate frequency of referral of certain Reasons For Care had changed significantly. There were less anxiety, phobias, and addiction referrals. There were also significantly more Anger and Depression referrals. In Cohort Two there was significantly more use of Assessment as a Care Aim and significantly less use of Problem Resolution. Eating Disorders and Relationship/Social problems consistently employed most time in contact across Cohort One and Two. The evaluation of caseload and casemix across time revealed that there was not a proportionate increase in Reasons For Care which were more demanding of time in Cohort Two. During Cohort Two increased demand was met in a shorter amount of time, this may have been due in part to increases in staff and the use of brief interventions where possible. Further service level agreements could consider head counts, proportions of specific Reasons For Care and the provision of long or short-term therapies to prevent excessive demand and increase clinical and cost effectiveness.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.797169  DOI: Not available
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