Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.797165
Title: The sleep of stable bipolar outpatients : a controlled naturalistic study using actigraphy
Author: Millar, Audrey
Awarding Body: University of Glasgow
Current Institution: University of Glasgow
Date of Award: 2001
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Abstract:
Objective: To determine which issues clinical psychologists think are important in decisions about allocating patients to anxiety management groups, and to determine whether they are in agreement about the allocation of patients. Design: A survey design by questionnaire was implemented. Setting: Trust primary health care settings in all sectors of Glasgow. Participants: Thirtv-five qualified clinical psychologists working in adult mental health within Glasgow Trust were surveyed. Twenty-three responded and were included. Results: The majority (74%) thought anxiety management groups were useful, and could be used as the sole intervention in some cases. In decisions about allocation the patient's presentation (ie nature and chronicity of anxiety) and some practical issues, such as the likely mix of people in the group, were rated as being important. Demographic variables (eg age, occupation) were relatively unimportant in the decision. Clinicians were less likely to include patients with a severe level of anxiety (as opposed to mild/ moderate), and those whose problem had been present for more than three years. Comorbid problems most likely to lead to exclusion from groups were severe depression, substance or alcohol abuse, current criminal behaviour, and personality disorder. However there was a wide range of opinions about appropriate inclusion, which was also reflected in clinicians' decisions about particular cases (based on case vignettes). Conclusion: The wide range of opinion perhaps demonstrates the need for standardisation. Further outcome research aimed at identifying those who benefit most from group management would allow criteria for allocation to be outlined.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.797165  DOI: Not available
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