Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.794860
Title: Representative bureaucracy : British ethnic minorities and the police, with a focus on 'stop and search orders'
Author: Moyo, Thulani Phillip
ISNI:       0000 0004 8501 3459
Awarding Body: Glasgow Caledonian University
Current Institution: Glasgow Caledonian University
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
The theory of representative bureaucracy has been argued by some scholars to be an equity oriented tool that could work to alter the negative aspects of majority rule. A public workforce representative of its clients with regards to; gender, race and ethnicity will ensure that the interests of all citizens are served. This was Mosher (1968)'s view of bureaucratic decision-making, according to the theory of representative bureaucracy. In the context of policing, a diverse police force can mitigate the institutionalized practice of officers acting on implicit assumptions about ethnic minorities being inherently more unlawful than their non-minority counterparts. The question is, does active representation in the law enforcement agency affect policing outcomes? It is argued that passive representation in the police force is inversely associated with individuals from an ethnic minority background being subjected to stop and search orders. This study explores whether a link from passive representation to active representation does exist in the UK policing. It is however, not guaranteed that a bureaucrat sharing a similar trait or characteristics as the group being served will inherently work for policy outputs that will benefit his/her minority groups. The study argues that, when the police force is representative of the population they serve, fewer individuals from an ethnic minority background (i.e. Black and Asian), will be stopped and searched under section 1 and section 60. The data was drawn from various Home Office publications and Office for National Statistics to test the theory of representative bureaucracy. The study tests whether an increase in representation of Black and Asian individuals leads to fewer Black and Asian individuals subjected to section 1 and section 60 stops and searches. Also, the study argues that, a diverse police force in terms of gender and race should lead to positive outcomes for ethnic minority individuals. Findings - Under section 1, first, as the ratio of Black to White officers at street level increases, so do the section 1 stops and searches of Black individuals. Second, an increase in the ratio of females to male officers at both senior and street level in the police force, translates to positive outcomes for Black individuals. Third, as the ratio of Asian to White officers' increases, so do the section 1 stops and searches of Asian individuals. Fourth, an increase in the ratio of females to male officers at both senior and street level in the police force, translates to negative outcomes for Asian individuals. Under section 60, first, as the ratio of Black to White officers' increases, so do the section 60 stops and searches of Black individuals. Second, as the ratio of Asian to White officers' increases, so do the section 60 stops and searches of Asian individuals. Third, an increase in the ratio of females to male officers at both senior and street level in the police force, translates to negative outcomes for both Black and Asian individuals. Interestingly, an increase in the number of female officers in the police force leads to positive outcomes for Black individuals.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.794860  DOI: Not available
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