Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.794765
Title: Living and learning through song
Author: Poole, Simon E.
Awarding Body: University of Chester
Current Institution: University of Chester
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
autoethnography is concerned with the tension between innovation and tradition in the craft of songwriting and the learning this allows for. It is formed by two parts; the following written thesis and a choral song entitled 'The Walk to Kitty's Stone'. The work draws upon my own experiences whilst writing this song and qualitative data obtained through recorded discussions with other songwriters, with whom I am part of a folk group called 'the loose kites'. The thesis is structured and viewed through a folkloristic lens. Bausinger's work and his concepts of the spatial, temporal and social horizons expanding provide this lens and offer a theoretical framework for folk culture in the digital world to be investigated. Two research methods of songwriting are used within this framework to consider the learning that occurs. The first method allows for an expression of a psychogeographical understanding using a machine called a 'Perambulographer' which enabled me to draw graphic scores for composition while walking. The second method was an exercise in ekphrastic lyric writing. Learning is considered in terms of informal education, and music pedagogy and as such builds upon Green's research. The key interpretations from the research highlight notions of authenticity, respect, political awareness and democratic values as significant features of songwriting. This study does not offer any new pedagogy but instead highlights how songwriting as 'craft-based practice as research' might offer an opportunity for songwriters to appreciate the relationships and values that they embody in their practice, specifically with regards to their own identity, when teaching. The work proposes that a songwriter's home and folk culture has a significant influence on their identity and how they write songs. The main advance in practice is the development of a theory of 'be-longing' underpinning the advocacy of a folkloristic disposition in the context of education.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ed.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.794765  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Education ; Pedagogy ; Songwriter
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