Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.793513
Title: Exploring parenting stress levels and its predicting factors in parents of children with developmental coordination disorder
Author: Jijon Nemalceff, Ana M.
ISNI:       0000 0004 8503 0582
Awarding Body: University of Surrey
Current Institution: University of Surrey
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
Background: There is evidence that parents of children with neurodevelopmental disorders report higher levels of parenting stress compared to parents of typically developing (TD) children, with more than half of those parents experiencing levels of parenting stress within the clinical range. However, there is very little research on whether parents of children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) also experience high levels of parenting stress, and, if so, the factors that contribute to this stress. Aim: The current study explored whether parents of children with DCD experience higher levels of parenting stress compared to parents of TD children, and the factors that predict parenting stress in parents of children with DCD. Method: 174 parents of children (ages 5-12) with a diagnosis of DCD and 24 parents of TD children participated in an online survey. Participants completed five questionnaires measuring parenting stress, social support, parenting self-efficacy, the child's emotional and behavioural problems, and severity of the child's motor coordination problems. Results: Parents of children with DCD reported experiencing significantly higher levels of parenting stress than parents of TD children. Two-thirds of parents of children with DCD reported experiencing levels of parenting stress within the clinical range. The severity of the child's emotional and behavioural problems, the level of social support and parenting self-efficacy were found to be significant predictors of parenting stress, but not the severity of the child's motor difficulties. Discussion: These findings are mostly consistent with research on other neurodevelopmental disorders. They highlight that these parents may be a vulnerable group which requires support from professionals to cope with the demands of caring for their children. The management of behavioural problems, the parent's self-efficacy, and increasing the level of social support should be considered in the development of tailored interventions for these parents.
Supervisor: Leonard, Hayley C. Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Psych.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.793513  DOI:
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