Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.792934
Title: Cyber wargaming : finding, designing, and playing wargames for cyber security education
Author: Haggman, Andreas
ISNI:       0000 0004 8500 7331
Awarding Body: Royal Holloway, University of London
Current Institution: Royal Holloway, University of London
Date of Award: 2019
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
This thesis investigates, and contributes to, the use of wargaming in cyber security education. Wargaming has a rich history of pedagogic use, but little work exists that addresses the critically important subject of cyber security. Cyber security is a global problem that frequently makes news headlines, yet the field is dogged with a reputation as a domain only for technologists, when in fact cyber security requires a whole gamut of approaches to be properly understood. The thesis is broadly divided into three parts. The first part is a comprehensive literature review of wargaming scholarship, analysing the benefits and drawbacks of wargaming, and some of the justifications for why a tabletop boardgame may be more effective than a game enhanced by technology. Following on from this, the thesis provides an outline of current work in cyber wargaming by analysing existing games, evaluating their contributions as educational tools, and identifying successful game mechanics and components. The second part of the thesis outlines the design process of an original wargame created for cyber security education and awareness training. The analysis outlines what the game design intends to achieve in terms of pedagogical outcomes and how the design evolved through the development process. In this part some methodological considerations around the research are also analysed, including how the thesis uses grounded theory and ethnography as academic underpinnings, and issues around the researcher's positionality during fieldwork. The final part of the thesis reports on the deployment of the original game to a wide variety of organisations. Both quantitative and qualitative data is analysed to ascertain what players learned from playing the game and evaluates the effectiveness of the game by comparing it to previous theoretical findings. Finally, the researcher's experiences of conducting the thesis are evaluated with close reference to the identified methodological considerations.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.792934  DOI: Not available
Keywords: cyber security ; wargaming ; education
Share: