Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.792656
Title: Language and cognitive development over the early school years in children learning English as an additional language
Author: Whiteside, Katie Elizabeth
Awarding Body: Royal Holloway, University of London
Current Institution: Royal Holloway, University of London
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
This thesis presents a series of studies (Chapters 2-6) which explored the language and cognitive development of children learning English as an additional language (EAL) over the early school years. Chapter 2 reports that English language competence in reception year (ages 4-5 years), in both children with EAL and monolingual English-speaking peers, is predictive of concurrent behavioural functioning and academic attainment over the early school years. Furthermore, relative to monolingual peers with comparable English language proficiency in reception, children with EAL displayed advantages in behaviour and meeting academic targets. Chapter 3 explored associations between EAL status, English language proficiency, and executive function in Year 1 (ages 5-6 years). Limited support was found for the controversial theory that bilingualism is associated with executive function advantages. However, children with EAL and monolingual peers with comparably low English language proficiency differed on specific executive function measures, highlighting that such measures may help disentangle language impairment from limited language experience. Chapter 4 reports that a monolingualnormed English language battery administered in Year 1 identified children with EAL and monolingual peers who continued to display comparably low English language proficiency in Year 3 (ages 7-8 years) and had comparable academic attainment in Year 2 (ages 6-7 years). Chapter 5 demonstrated that Year 1 measures of executive function, nonword repetition, and non-verbal ability do not improve prediction of English language proficiency in Year 3 in children with EAL, over and above Year 1 performance on an English language battery. Finally, Chapter 6 explored associations between language exposure, first language development, and English language proficiency in reception and Year 3 among children with EAL. Age of early language milestones were most strongly associated with English language competence at both time points and may therefore help identify children with EAL who will likely display persistent English language difficulties.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.792656  DOI: Not available
Keywords: English as an additional language ; Language development ; Language impairment ; Executive function
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