Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.792636
Title: Reflections of a nation : 'Antigone' on the modern Greek stage
Author: Michael, Andria
ISNI:       0000 0004 8499 3969
Awarding Body: Royal Holloway, University of London
Current Institution: Royal Holloway, University of London
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
This thesis is a study of performances of Sophocles' 'Antigone' on the modern Greek stage, their political and social resonances, their cultural contexts and their role in the formation and presentation of modern Greek national identity. It is the result of research concerning the revival of ancient Greek drama, in accordance with modern Greek theatre history as well as with the broader history of the modern Greek nation. As a play political in its essence, Antigone has been widely used as a political statement in the Greek revivals from the second half of the nineteenth century onwards. To attempt an examination and analysis of such performances covering this long period of time means to simultaneously examine the key events of the country: the liberation from Ottoman Rule, the early process of formation of the new state, the hotly disputed conflict of the Language Question, the modernist Generation of the 1930s, the Greek Civil War, the Dictatorship of 1967-1974, as well as many other significant events and movements of modern Greek history. The approach of the work is qualitative rather than quantitative. The aim is to choose the specific moments when theatre and politics cross paths, to examine the connections between artistic choices and political incentives, and to highlight the moments which eventually reveal that Antigone has been repeatedly used as a platform for political or politically charged issues, conflicts and agendas. The ultimate goal of this research is to reveal that the intense political, rather than aesthetic, interpretations of modern Greek revivals have frequently neglected the performances as such, as well as the text of 'Antigone' itself, and have instead concentrated on the issues and conflicts of each period in question.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.792636  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Andria Michael ; Classics Reception ; Antigone ; Ancient Greek Theatre ; Modern Greece
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