Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.792546
Title: The roles of illness beliefs, illness behaviours, and self-compassion in adjustment to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Author: Kenefick, Emily
ISNI:       0000 0004 8499 1306
Awarding Body: Royal Holloway, University of London
Current Institution: Royal Holloway, University of London
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
Illness beliefs, illness behaviours and self-compassion have been associated with adjustment outcomes in illness. This cross-sectional study investigates the roles of illness beliefs, illness behaviours and self-compassion in adjustment to COPD, and explores possible relationships between these variables. To carry out these aims, COPD patients (n= 26) were recruited from NHS services to complete questionnaires regarding adjustment to illness, illness beliefs, self-compassion, and specific illness behaviours- limiting and all-or-nothing behaviour patterns. Contrary to hypotheses and previous research, illness beliefs did not account for a significant amount of variance in adjustment to COPD. However, illness behaviours and self-compassion were found to be associated with adjustment. Findings demonstrated the role of limiting behaviour patterns as a key variable in explaining adjustment in terms of depression, and as a mediating variable in the relationship between self-compassion and depression; higher self-compassion was associated with lower levels of limiting behaviour patterns, and in turn with lower depression. All-ornothing behaviour patterns were found to be a key variable in explaining adjustment in terms of anxiety, and as a mediating variable in the relationship between selfcompassion and anxiety; higher self-compassion was associated with lower levels of all-or-nothing behaviour patterns, and in turn with lower anxiety. In exploratory analyses, the relationship between self-compassion and quality of life (emotional functioning) was serially mediated by limiting behaviour patterns and depression, such that higher self-compassion was associated with lower levels of limiting behaviour patterns, and in turn, lower depression, and thus better quality of life (emotional functioning). It was concluded that illness behaviours and self-compassion should be considered in psychological interventions around adjustment to COPD. It is suggested that enhancing self-compassion might help patients to avoid limiting or all-or-nothing behaviour patterns, which might have a positive effect on mood and anxiety, and in turn on quality of life.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.792546  DOI: Not available
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