Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.792536
Title: Understanding friendships and disclosure decisions in young people living with behaviourally acquired HIV
Author: McKenzie, Evelyn
ISNI:       0000 0004 8499 1090
Awarding Body: Royal Holloway, University of London
Current Institution: Royal Holloway, University of London
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
The development of friendships is particularly important in adolescence and emerging adulthood. Young people living with behaviourally acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus (BAHIV) face important decisions about whom to disclose their HIV status to. Disclosing one's HIV status to different people (e.g. friends, family, or sexual partners) is likely to involve different processes. Social support may help people adjust to living with HIV. While previous research has investigated disclosure decisions and social support in people living with HIV, most studies have involved quantitative methods and none have looked at the unique role of friendships for young people living with BAHIV. This Grounded Theory study aimed to identify the factors that impact on the development of friendships in young people (aged 16-26) living with BAHIV and the factors influencing HIV disclosure to friends. It also aimed to understand the role of friendships post-diagnosis in young people living with BAHIV. A final aim was to develop a theoretical model of friendships and disclosure decisions in young people living with BAHIV. Ten participants were recruited from two inner city London HIV clinics and interviewed about their experiences of friendships, and disclosure decisions within friendships. All participants had been living with BAHIV for at least one year. The sample varied in terms of gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. Data analysis led to a theoretical model comprising four theoretical codes: 1) Personal factors influencing HIV disclosure decisions in friendships; 2) Social factors influencing HIV disclosure decisions in friendships; 3) Disclosure decision outcomes in friendships; and 4) Post-diagnosis experiences of friendships in the context of other aspects of life. The findings highlight a number of suggestions for supporting young people living with BAHIV. These are presented alongside possibilities for future research.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.792536  DOI: Not available
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