Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.792489
Title: A cultural response to dementia : participatory arts in care homes and relationship-centred care
Author: Hatton, Nicola
ISNI:       0000 0004 8498 9142
Awarding Body: Royal Holloway, University of London
Current Institution: Royal Holloway, University of London
Date of Award: 2016
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
This thesis looks at the role of the arts in dementia care. It examines the creative role of the artist in dementia care settings, and questions what a cultural response to dementia might mean in the context of the emerging field of arts in dementia care. Moreover, it extends current thinking on dementia care by investigating the broader social, environmental and cultural conditions in which caregiving takes place. Inspired by posthumanism and concepts of sensuous geography, it explores the wider network of human and non-human relationships that exist within and shape a care home community. Drawing on a set of case studies of participatory arts projects in care homes, it then considers how artists might support care communities as relational places by engaging with the sensory and aesthetic qualities of the care home. Through these case studies, it explores how artists respond imaginatively to the environment they are working in, and to the daily routines of the care home. In exploring the challenges and possibilities of this approach, particular attention is paid to the intersections between an artist's creative practice and the creativity that is demonstrated by residents with dementia as they negotiate everyday life in a care home. By engaging creatively with the everyday routines of the residents, this thesis shows how collaborations between artists and people with dementia can reveal care homes as sites of everyday creativity. Bringing together critical thinking on creativity, relationality and dementia care, it argues that the arts have a cultural role to play in care homes by demonstrating that caregiving is a creative, improvisatory and relational practice.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.792489  DOI: Not available
Share: