Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.792385
Title: Family functioning and its relationship to adolescent mental health
Author: Butler, Carly
ISNI:       0000 0004 8498 4720
Awarding Body: Royal Holloway, University of London
Current Institution: Royal Holloway, University of London
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
In recent years, the field of developmental psychopathology has seen a shift away from studying mental illness towards more strengths-based conceptualisations of mental health, often termed 'well-being'. Whilst family functioning is a wellestablished risk factor for developmental psychopathology, relatively little is known about its contribution towards adolescent well-being. Where research has been conducted in this field, family functioning is often poorly operationalised using narrow conceptualisations, such as parent-adolescent conflict. Furthermore, our understanding of the potential processes underlying the link between family functioning and adolescent psychopathology remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between family functioning and adolescent well-being. The study also explored the potential mediating role of well-being in the relationship between family functioning and psychopathology. Using a cross-sectional design, students aged 13-16 years (N =112) completed self-reported measures of family functioning, life satisfaction, psychological well-being and internalising and externalising behaviours. The results revealed that poorer family functioning was significantly associated with lower levels of adolescent life satisfaction and psychological well-being. Findings from multiple regression analyses showed that the family's ability to adapt to difficulties appeared to be uniquely associated with both life satisfaction and psychological well-being. Lastly, life satisfaction was found to mediate the relationship between family functioning and externalising behaviours, whilst psychological well-being mediated the relationship between family functioning and internalising behaviours. The findings highlight the important role of the family on adolescent well-being, and suggest that well-being may provide a pathway by which family functioning influences adolescent psychopathology. The results draw attention to the potential clinical utility of involving families in well-being interventions, particularly to supporting adaptability and problem solving. The results also highlight the benefits of promoting adolescent life satisfaction and psychological well-being in both the general and targeted populations to guard against the development of internalising and externalising behaviours.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.792385  DOI: Not available
Keywords: family ; adolescence ; well-being ; mental health ; life satisfaction ; psychological well-being
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