Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.792168
Title: Incorporating the other : investigating body representation and social cognition
Author: Farmer, Harry
ISNI:       0000 0004 8497 6499
Awarding Body: Royal Holloway, University of London
Current Institution: Royal Holloway, University of London
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
The aim of the experiments reported in this thesis was to investigate the relationship between the multisensory based processes involved in the generation of a sense of bodily selfhood and the processes involved in social cognition. The experiments in chapter 2 investigated the effect of skin colour on body ownership and found that participants could indeed experience body ownership over a rubber hand with the skin colour of a racial out-group. The experiments in chapter 3 found evidence that synchronous multisensory stimulation over a hand with the skin colour of a racial out-group led to more positive implicit attitudes towards members of that racial out-group and reduced corticospinal activation when watching either tactile or painful stimuli applied to an out-group hand. The experiments in chapter 4 investigated whether feeling body ownership over an elderly hand would lead to activation of the elderly stereotype and thus cause participants to imagine their movements as being slower on a motor imagery task. They found that it was possible to induce ownership over the elderly hand and that participants who experienced higher levels of ownership over the old hand imagined their movements as being slower. Experiments 5.1 and 5.2 investigated whether IMS would lead to increased trust. They found that synchronous IMS led to higher ratings of trust and higher offers in a trust game. Experiment 5.3 found that trustworthiness leads to increased perceived facial similarity. Experiment 6.1 used fMRI to demonstrate that brain areas involved in action observation are modulated by the trustworthiness of an actor.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.792168  DOI: Not available
Keywords: social cognition ; embodied cognition ; body ownership ; rubber hand illusion ; trust game ; implicit bias
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