Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.791475
Title: Tropical forest and the Chewong in Peninsular Malaysia
Author: Sittimongkol, Saifon
ISNI:       0000 0004 8502 369X
Awarding Body: University of Nottingham
Current Institution: University of Nottingham
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
This research examined the relationship between the Chewong, forest-dwellers, and the tropical forest of Krau Wildlife Reserve, Peninsular Malaysia. The three main focusses were the relationship between the Chewong and the variety of plants used in daily life, patterns of forest recovery following shifting agriculture by forest residents, and the Chewong's perception of their interaction with the forest of Krau utilizing mixed methods methodology. In total, the use of 243 plant species was documented, which the Chewong use based on traditional knowledge such as Klanyi (Dialium indum L., Leguminosae), used for food resource, medicine, construction material, and firewood, including the non-timber forest product for commercial trade. The agricultural system had variable effects on the trajectory of forest succession, depending on the main crops and trees planted. In contrast, managed fruit gardens had limited effects on forest structure and overall composition. Concerns have been expressed regarding the sustainability of forest product harvesting and the relative rights of group members residing inside or adjacent to the forest reserve. The Chewong population in the forest is relatively stable, but the shift from traditional practices to use of modern tools and increasing marketisation of particular commodities are driving changes in the manner in which the Chewong use the forest. These findings have implications for understanding the dynamics at macro levels of indigenous people and their relationship with forests, including its contribution to forest conservation.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.791475  DOI: Not available
Keywords: SD Forestry
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