Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.790945
Title: The role of metacognition in supporting the development of Looked After Children's reading skills
Author: Britto, Patricia Monisola
ISNI:       0000 0004 8500 1909
Awarding Body: UCL (University College London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
The United Kingdom's national statistics shows that at Key Stage 2 Looked after Children's [LAC's] reading outcomes are lower in comparison to their peers. Several government-led initiatives, as well as studies on reading interventions to support LAC, exist; yet, their outcomes remain lower than their peers. The present study explored the role metacognition plays in developing LAC's reading (fluency and comprehension) skills. LAC aged 9 to 11 identified as having poor reading comprehension and fluency skills took part in a teacher-led reading intervention focused on using meta-cognitive strategies, over 12 weeks. A mixed method design was adopted, utilising a multiple-case study approach. LAC were assessed pre- and post-intervention using cognitive, reading and psychosocial measures. LAC (N=6), their teachers (N=5) and their carers (N=6) engaged in post-intervention interviews. Although not analysed statistically due to the sample size, the quantitative data suggests that all LAC improved their reading comprehension skills and the use of metacognitive strategies. Half of the LAC's reading accuracy skills increased, and 5 out of 6 of them also demonstrated improvements in reading fluency. The reading intervention had a positive impact on all LAC's general understanding of verbal concepts and 5 out of 6 improved their word definition skills. All LAC reported gains in confidence as learners and an increase was noticed for one child who initially identified as having a 'low' sense of school belonging.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.790945  DOI: Not available
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