Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.790384
Title: Mindfulness in schools : exploring the impact on internalising difficulties, the role of home practice and the mechanisms of psychological change
Author: Phipps, A.
ISNI:       0000 0004 8497 7598
Awarding Body: University College London (UCL)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
Anxiety is the most common form of psychopathology in childhood and adolescence. There is growing evidence that mindfulness-based approaches may be effective in reducing anxiety among children. This study used a mixed methods design to explore the possible benefits of the Mindful Attention Programme (MAP), which is yet to be evaluated. One hundred and sixty-two children aged 9-10 years completed measures of anxiety, negative automatic thoughts and mindfulness before and after the programme. The results showed that the MAP had a non-significant effect on anxiety (p = 0.052) and negative thoughts (p = 0.055). The MAP had a significant effect on mindfulness scores, which increased over time (p = 0.02). There was no relationship between home practice (i.e. reported completion of meditations at home) and outcomes which contradicts previous findings. The second phase of the research included two parts: an open-ended questionnaire and focus groups. The questionnaire revealed that there were a number of barriers to practising at home but also enabled the children to make recommendations about how to make home practice easier. Three focus groups were facilitated and analysed using thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified (reported change, mechanisms of change and home practice). The implications for the knowledge base, practice and future research are discussed.
Supervisor: Dunsmuir, S. Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.790384  DOI: Not available
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