Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.787943
Title: Examining the relationship between shame and disordered eating
Author: MacCormac, Elinor
ISNI:       0000 0004 7973 0494
Awarding Body: Cardiff University
Current Institution: Cardiff University
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
Shame has been indicated in the development and maintenance of a range of mental health difficulties, including eating disorders. Understanding the interaction between shame and other factors relating to eating disordered behaviour will enable researchers and clinicians to adapt and apply the most effective interventions to target these factors when treating eating disorders. Paper 1 presents a systematic review examining whether there is a relationship between shame and BMI in men. 15 studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria for inclusion in the review. Study quality was assessed with the AXIS tool before data extraction. There appears to be a trend in the research indicating a relationship between shame and BMI in men. However, due to recurrent methodological and reporting quality issues in the evidence base, no firm conclusions can be drawn. Clinical and research considerations are addressed. Paper 1 presents a systematic review examining whether there is a relationship between shame and BMI in men. 15 studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria for inclusion in the review. Study quality was assessed with the AXIS tool before data extraction. There appears to be a trend in the research indicating a relationship between shame and BMI in men. However, due to recurrent methodological and reporting quality issues in the evidence base, no firm conclusions can be drawn. Clinical and research considerations are addressed. Paper 3 presents a critical appraisal of the research process. This paper includes reflections on the different elements of the research in both papers. It will discuss the implications of the findings and suggestions for clinical practice and future research. Personal and professional competency development is also discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.787943  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology
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