Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.787896
Title: Recovery experiences of forensic mental health service users
Author: McKenzie-Smith, L.
Awarding Body: Canterbury Christ Church University
Current Institution: Canterbury Christ Church University
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
Background: Current models of recovery are based on forensic mental health service users' experiences. However, there is a lack of research into the experiences of those from ethnic backgrounds, despite being over-represented within forensic mental health settings. Aim: This research aimed to develop a framework for understanding the recovery experiences of forensic mental health service users of ethnic background. Methods: Upon gaining ethical approval, semi-structured interviews were held with 10 participants. The data were analysed using a critical realist approach to Grounded Theory. Findings: Five core categories were identified; the self, the network, the institution, recovery as a process, and the individual context. Similarities were drawn to existing models in which the self, network and institution interact to influence recovery. Differences were found regarding stigma. Individual context influenced the process, with cultural considerations regarding food, alternative treatments and spiritual beliefs playing an important role, as well as individuals' experiences of adversity. Implications: It is concluded that the developed framework provides an initial understanding of the recovery experiences of this subgroup that can be used to develop services to meet the unique needs of this subgroup. Future research expanding on these findings is discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.787896  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF0636 Applied psychology
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