Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.787493
Title: Psychological interventions for first-episode psychosis : an exploration of individual and group interventions
Author: Benton, Carla
ISNI:       0000 0004 7972 6065
Awarding Body: Bangor University
Current Institution: Bangor University
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
This thesis explores psychological interventions for young people experiencing psychosis, with a specific focus on group interventions, across three individual papers. The first paper presents a systematic review comparing the efficacy of individual and group psychological interventions for improving symptoms and functioning in a sample of young people experiencing first-episode psychosis (FEP). The findings of 12 studies were synthesised narratively, with comparisons of interventions and studies being made. Results were inconclusive, with mixed findings for the efficacy of individual and group interventions for improving symptoms and functioning. However, there were promising findings that both modalities may offer some benefits for functioning. Limitations, clinical implications and areas for future research are explored. The second paper presents the findings from an empirical study exploring young peoples' experiences of engaging with an outdoor therapy group (OTG) run by an Early Intervention in Psychosis Service (EIPS). A total of six interviews were undertaken, and were analysed using Thematic Analysis. The analysis identified two main themes: "I was a bit nervous to begin with" and "Turn my life around for the better", which contained six subthemes: "We're all in the same boat", "My mental health has improved and improved", "I thought I'd have an adventure", "Makes me wanna change", "It just brought confidence/I ain't a waste of space" and "I hope it can help other young people". The findings are promising for the benefits of OTGs with EIPS populations. Limitations, clinical implications and areas for future research are explored. The final paper considers the clinical and theoretical implications arising from both papers, and personal reflections of the process are discussed. Recommendations include better quality EIPS group intervention studies, more research with FEP samples and feasibility studies of OTGs in EIPS to provide a basis for the development of the intervention within services.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.787493  DOI: Not available
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