Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.787337
Title: Exploring the engagement in clairvoyant readings : attending to the lived experiences of patrons
Author: Feeley, Sara Louise
ISNI:       0000 0004 7972 457X
Awarding Body: University of Wolverhampton
Current Institution: University of Wolverhampton
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
Recent research claims that clairvoyant readings are therapeutic (Beischel, Mosher & Boccuzzi, 2015; Nelson, 2013; Osborne & Bacon, 2015; Roxburgh, 2010; Sanger, 2009), as such it is possible that there are an unknown population seeking support through this alternative practice. An exploration of the lived experience of patrons of Clairvoyants was studied to ascertain whether the engagement is done so to meet a need, that may be more appropriately met in traditional therapeutic services. A Qualitative approach was adopted, Semi-structured interviews were analysed using Relational Phenomenological Analysis (RPA). Six participants were interviewed about their beliefs and engagement in clairvoyant readings. One main theme emerged; Clairvoyant readings as a way of managing loss, with four subthemes; Readings in place of Traditional support, Need for reassurance and proof of existence- to manage anxiety, The conflict of rational and emotional, Sense of belonging and connectedness. Readings with clairvoyants may potentially be harmful, despite patrons expressing benefits. Due to an unknown percentage of the population engaging in readings, it was found that additional research is needed in this area, as the phenomena appears to be underrepresented in Psychological empiricism.
Supervisor: Taiwo, Abigail ; Meredith, Joanne Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Prof.Couns.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.787337  DOI: Not available
Keywords: clairvoyant readings ; relational phenomenological analysis ; lived experience ; bereavement and loss ; alternatives to traditional psychological support
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