Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.784105
Title: The role of perceived risk and trust in the conceptualisation of packaged food consideration sets by consumers managing severe food allergies
Author: MacDougall, Alison
ISNI:       0000 0004 7969 6724
Awarding Body: University of Gloucestershire
Current Institution: University of Gloucestershire
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
The study focuses on the role of perceived risk and trust in the conceptualisation of consideration sets. The research is situated in the context of consumer households managing life-threatening food allergies. This qualitative research is guided by an objective relativist epistemological perspective. In-depth oral history style interviews were used to generate data from 30 consumers divided into in three cohorts. The three cohorts are: adults with allergies; parents of adolescents with allergies; and parents of children with allergies. The thirty consumers were responsible for packaged food shopping for their household, and were supported in the interviews by nineteen additional family members. All interviews were transcribed and the data analysis was conducted based on a narrative approach and coding was done in the NVivo software tool. Key themes and subthemes relating to perceived risk and trust were then identified. This study explored three research questions on the role of trust, the role of perceived risk and the interrelationship between perceived risk and trust. From the themes identified in the research, it was found that that trust and perceived risk play an important role in the conceptualisation of packaged food consideration sets. Contributions of this study include the identification of the interrelationship between perceived risk and trust in the conceptualisation of packaged food consideration sets, as displayed in a revised conceptual model that shows a relative inverse relationship between perceived risk and trust in this context. This revised conceptual model can be situated within the strategies of the food choice process model, and with this extends the use of food choice theory and models in consumer marketing. Finally, personal relationships were found to be important to the conceptualisation of consideration sets and based on the data generated from the interviews, a visualisation of the role of these relationships is presented. A methodological contribution of the study is expanding the use of oral history methods in the consumer marketing discipline.
Supervisor: Ward, Philippa ; Maddock, Sarah Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.784105  DOI: Not available
Keywords: HF5387 Business Ethics ; HF5428 Retail Trade
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