Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.783788
Title: Loosening the saxophone : entanglements of bodies in the politics of free improvisation
Author: Krekels, Tina
ISNI:       0000 0004 7969 370X
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
Loosening The Saxophone. Entanglement of Bodies in the Politics of Free Improvisation follows the works and practices of women, spit and non/human bodies within political spaces of free improvisation. This practice-led research establishes an entangled research method, in writing and practice. It develops a method of story writing focussing on an entanglement between socio-political free improvisation performances, my own practical development with the saxophone and a feminist writing approach giving accounts of female, liquid spaces. The touchings of my tongue, spit and hands on the saxophone's body are explored allowing an entangled relationship between performer and instrument that might challenge masculine performance spaces. The masculine space in this thesis is defined as one that establishes hierarchical structures of performance approaches in free improvisation. A technofeminist critique is used to challenge these dichotomous ideas by working through scholarly case-studies and my own playing. The female critique used here is that of loosening body boundaries through enactive relationships. My feminist improvisation uses this loose and liquid approach by establishing different playing and preparation techniques of the saxophone. It is through touch that our bodies materialise into a momentary performance.
Supervisor: Nelson, Peter ; Fusco, Maria Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.783788  DOI: Not available
Keywords: free improvisation ; practice-led research ; saxophone ; technofeminist critique
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