Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.783202
Title: Becoming an "ACT person" : a grounded analysis of practitioners who apply ACT across multiple professional settings
Author: Darby, Michael
ISNI:       0000 0004 7968 7991
Awarding Body: City, University of London
Current Institution: City, University of London
Date of Award: 2019
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Abstract:
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is applied across many professional settings and by practitioners trained in many disciplines. This study investigated the processes involved when ACT practitioners (N = 12) applied ACT across more than one professional setting. An abbreviated version of grounded theory method, proposed as "Grounded Analysis" was applied. The resulting analysis was focused around the organising construct "Becoming an ACT person", which comprised five categories "Understanding what ACT can mean"; "Learning by doing"; "Expanding professionally"; "Transforming personally"; "Belonging to a social movement". Some findings, such as an emphasis on personal transformation and experiential learning are in accord with the extant literature. Other findings appear to be novel: Each participant had a unique way of understanding, constructing and delivering ACT. Many participants' personal and professional identities evolved over time as they self-identified an 'ACT person'. Delivering ACT involved belonging to a social activist movement for change. The study findings suggest that the ways in which ACT is delivered as 'evidence based practice' varies between practitioners. The discussion suggests that ACT research may benefit from the adoption of more qualitative practitioner studies. Implications for the disciplines of ACT and counselling psychology are explored.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.783202  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology
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