Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.783164
Title: Stigma : personality disorder and homicide in the U.K. red-top tabloid press, 2001-2012
Author: Bowen, Matt
ISNI:       0000 0004 7968 7617
Awarding Body: University of Chester
Current Institution: University of Chester
Date of Award: 2018
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Please try the link below.
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
There is evidence of stigma towards people with personality disorder from within healthcare systems, but relatively little known about other aspects of stigmatisation. This study explored the image within the red-top tabloids of people with personality disorder who have committed homicide and how this may have contributed to the processes of stigmatisation. The analysis was underpinned by a symbolic interactionist perspective on individuals and society and was informed by the modified labelling model. The role the press plays in the processes of stigmatisation is elaborated through exploration of the theoretical models and empirical evidence. The data set for the thesis was articles published by the red-top tabloids between the years 2001 and 2012 (inclusively) that made reference to personality disorder. The data set was analysed using three methods: content analysis, corpus linguistics and frame analysis. The three methods were used in a mixed methods approach with a sequential design so that the results from one stage of the analysis fed into the next stage. The content analysis of the data set identified that of the 552 articles published about people with personality disorder, 42% met the criteria for being homicide themed. Analysis identified that there was a significant reduction in the proportion of homicide themed newspaper articles in the period 2007-2012 compared to 2001-2006 ((1, n=552) = 7.38, p < .05), however, the effect size was small (φ = .12). Corpus linguistics analysis was used on articles that were homicide themed and identified 22 words that were stigmatising in their use, and were used proportionally more frequently than a comparator data set. These words were categorised as either epithets (e.g. psycho, monster), qualities (e.g. evil) or contributing to the process of labelling (e.g. branded). Comparison between 2001-2006 and 2007-2012 identified a proportional increase in the use of stigmatising descriptors, but to a level that was not considered to be significant ((1, n=114110) = 1.53, p > .05). Frame analysis of the homicide data set identified a dominant news frame in the articles, referred to as lock them up and throw away the key. This news frame was structured on a model that the problem was a failure to protect us, the public, from the risk presented by them, dangerous people with personality disorder who commit homicide. The results of the study are discussed in relation to the model elaborated in the study of the role the red-top tabloids may play in the processes of stigmatisation. Implications for practice include using personality disorder in press guidance, and training for clinicians about attitudes towards people with personality disorder to include reviewing the impact of the press.
Supervisor: Lovell, Andy ; McIntosh-Scott, Annette Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.783164  DOI: Not available
Keywords: personality disorder ; tabloid press ; stigma
Share: