Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.782318
Title: Supporting student emotional and mental health needs in a secondary school : staff understanding and self-efficacy
Author: Dobbie, Natalie
ISNI:       0000 0004 7967 9238
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
Secondary schools are thought to play a critical role in the support of adolescent emotional and mental health needs, but barriers have been identified. Secondary staff self-efficacy in supporting student emotional and mental health needs has not been explored in research. This study explored the views of staff employed in a range of roles in a secondary school who identified as supporting student emotional and mental health needs on a day-to-day basis. Using semi-structured interviews, the study aimed to explore staff understanding of emotional and mental health. Using Bandura's self-efficacy theory, it aimed to explore factors influencing staffs self-efficacy beliefs in supporting student emotional and mental health needs. Findings suggested staff could not identify the difference between emotional and mental health, which is consistent with the literature. Previous experience of perceived success in providing support was influential to self-efficacy beliefs. Lived experience of mental health difficulties was perceived as influential due to enhanced understanding. There was variation in the sources of information perceived to most greatly influence self-efficacy beliefs. Self-efficacy was found to be an individualised construct; consistent with Bandura's assertion. Implications for the LA and EP practice, as well as further research are considered.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.App.Ed.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.782318  DOI: Not available
Keywords: LB1603 Secondary Education. High schools
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