Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.781897
Title: An investigation into modularity-in-context and 3D printing for resource integration : an operations management perspective
Author: Davies, Philip Michael
ISNI:       0000 0004 7967 5106
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
Through a review of design, modularity and service-dominant logic literature, two design strategies were found to be prevalent within the literature; designing for low variety and designing for high variety. Whilst designing for low variety was found to be a mature phenomenon of interest, designing for high variety was emerging within the literature following advances in digital technologies and an understanding that value is co-created in use. Following three empirical studies, a theoretical understanding of designing for high variety as a process of resource integration has been developed that enables a greater understanding as to how organisations can design for contexts characterised by high variety and continuous change. From this understanding, it is possible to answer the question, why does designing for high variety have different requirements to designing for low variety? The research addresses a number of gaps in the literature. First, the limitations of a designing for low variety within contexts characterised by high variety has not been empirically explored. Second, there is little theory associated with designing for high variety and resource integration. Third, why designing for high variety has different requirements to designing for low variety is a relatively understudied area in the literature, meaning no conceptual framework explaining the relationship between design and high variety exists. Fieldwork was carried out over a two year period in a large capital goods supplier in the UK which resulted in three empirical studies. These studies resulted in a number of significant findings. The results of the first study present a number of research propositions, some of which contradict existing thinking around modularity theory. Study two then conducted a quantitative investigation to test the relationship between design change complexity, use complexity and system viability, with significant results for the moderating role of use complexity found. The final study introduces 3D printing and quantitatively shows that its use in designing for high variety would enable a firm to modify and adapt the affordance of the physical asset to support the customer in absorbing the variety with the physical asset as opposed to relying on human activities to absorb said variety. Furthermore, it shows the benefits of 3D printing in certain contexts when compared to traditional manufacturing. From the three studies, a theoretical understanding of designing for high variety as a process of resource integration is developed. This provides a greater understanding as to how organisations can design for contexts characterised by high variety and continuous change. Namely, from the perspective of modularity, how can thin and thick crossing points be identified and created to allow the organisation to integrate resources at the point of use and allow the focal beneficiary to modify, tailor and adapt the organisations asset based upon their desired outcome in use. In addition, these findings allowed a mid-range theory for service-dominant logic to be derived.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council ; BAE Systems
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.781897  DOI: Not available
Keywords: TS Manufactures
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