Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.780340
Title: Business case analysis for social and environmental initiatives : the case of the Milton Keynes Electric Light Vehicle Infrastructure project
Author: Atchulo, Abukari Salifu
ISNI:       0000 0004 7965 9843
Awarding Body: Open University
Current Institution: Open University
Date of Award: 2015
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Abstract:
Concerns about climate change, energy security and advances in battery technology have stimulated a renewed interest in electric vehicles. The uptake of electric vehicles can encourage and facilitate the shift from fossil fuels to a low-carbon transport system. The Milton Keynes Electric Light Vehicle Infrastructure (ELVIS) project promotes widespread use of battery-powered cars. The organisations examined in this study use conventional accounting-based tools that Gray (2006) views as maximising capitalism to the exclusion of almost anything else that might be termed wonderful, aspirational or desirable to the human condition. Bebbington et al. (2007) indicate that sustainability assessment modelling is a superior technique for assessing sustainable development initiatives such as an engagement with electric vehicles. The model proposed by Bebbington et al. (2007) takes into consideration social, environmental and other externalities that conventional accounting does not account for. Using the lens of Dillard et al. (2004,) this study examined participating organisations in the Milton Keynes electric vehicle project and found out that these organisations are not applying sustainability assessment modelling to their engagement with electric vehicles or other such initiatives. The organisations seem to be either just paying lip service to the issue of sustainability, or they are in a transitional stage of their sustainability effort, or don't see the need for appropriate social accounting technologies such as sustainability assessment modelling.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.780340  DOI:
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