Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.779134
Title: The relationship between theory of mind and traits associated with autism spectrum condition and pathological demand avoidance presentations
Author: Bishop, Ellie
ISNI:       0000 0004 7964 8343
Awarding Body: UCL (University College London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
This thesis explores the relationship between theory of mind (ToM) and behaviour in childhood. It is presented in three parts. Part 1 is a systematic literature review examining the relationship between ToM and aggressive behaviour in childhood. The review focuses on studies of typically developing children which report correlation analyses between ToM and aggression. Using a meta-analysis, the review found a weak but significant relationship between better-developed ToM and lower levels of aggressive behaviour. Part 2, the empirical research paper, explores the profile of pathological demand avoidance (PDA) in autism spectrum conditions (ASC), and investigates the relationship between ToM and behaviours and traits associated with (1) ASC and (2) PDA. Quantitative data were collected via parent-report questionnaires and continuous and between-group analyses were conducted. Better parent-reported ToM was associated with lower levels of ASC traits, although no association was found between ToM and PDA traits. In addition, the findings support previous research arguing for the use of the PDA label to describe a set of symptoms within the autism spectrum. The results are discussed with reference to the wider literature and methodological limitations. This was part of a joint project with Anna Goodson, trainee clinical psychologist. Part 3 is a critical appraisal on the research as a whole. The methodological challenges and limitations of the study are discussed. Broader conceptual issues are considered before concluding with further reflections on my own personal experience of the research process.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.779134  DOI: Not available
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