Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.777464
Title: Arterial occlusion : a radiological study of a series of patients with peripheral, arterial disease
Author: Howie, G. F. A.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1968
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Abstract:
An unselected series of 546 patients, on whom 946 arteriograms were performed is considered. 1250 complete arterial occlusions were found. The incidence was 2.3 per patient, both in men and in women. It is suggested that the sex distribution of peripheral vascular disease in a population is more accurately indicated by the findings in gangrene and pregangrene where there are 2.3 and 2 men, respectively to 1 woman, than by those in intermittent claudication where the sex ratio is 4.8 men to 1 woman, Aortographic evidence is presented to suggest that aortic occlusion may originate directly in the aorta itself, in women, more commonly than previously believed. On the symptomatic side occlusion in the femoro -popliteal segment alone occurs in only 43.5% of the occluded symptomatic limbs in men, and in only 34.6% of those in women. Femoro-popliteal occlusion with leg artery occlusion occurs in 43.2% of the occluded symptomatic limbs in men, and in 40.7% of those in women. Leg artery occlusion alone occurs in 13.3% of the occluded symptomatic limbs in men, and in 24.7% of those in women. On the asymptomatic side femoro-popliteal artery occlusion alone occurs in 19.8% of the occluded limbs of men and in 9.7% in women. Femoro -popliteal occlusions with associated leg artery occlusion occurs in 20.7% of the occluded asymptomatic limbs in men, and in 25.8% of those in women. Leg artery occlusion alone occurs in 59.5% of the occluded asymptomatic limbs in men and in 64.5% of those in women. The patterns of occlusion in the lower limbs are recorded. The commonest pattern is occlusion of the superficial femoral artery alone, in both women and men. Second most common is occlusion of the anterior tibial artery alone in men, and of the posterior tibial artery alone in women, The occlusion patterns in men and women are considered in intermittent claudication, gangrene and pregangrene. Patients with complete occlusion in the aortoiliac group are younger than those with complete occlusion in the femoro-popliteal group. The patients with complete occlusion in the femoro-popliteal group are older than those without complete occlusion. In the aortoiliac group those with complete occlusion are younger than those without, The incidence of leg artery occlusion is the same in the symptomatic and asymptomatic limbs in intermittent claudication. It is suggested that there is evidence that the first artery to show complete occlusion in the lower limb tends to be a leg artery. The incidence of complete occlusion is higher in limbs in patients with unilateral symptoms, than in those with bilateral symptoms. The peak incidence of occlusion in the femoro-popliteal segment in women is more proximal in the adductor canal than in men. The femoro-popliteal occlusions in the limbs with leg artery occlusion are longer than in those without, and show a greater tendency to popliteal artery involvement. The occlusions in the symptomatic and asymptomatic limbs are considered. They are, very broadly, similar in their histographic appearances.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (M.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.777464  DOI: Not available
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