Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.777369
Title: The utility of behavioural science in landscape architecture : investigating the application of environment-behaviour theory and its research methods to fit the spatial agenda of design
Author: Southwell, Katherine Jane
Awarding Body: Heriot-Watt University
Current Institution: Heriot-Watt University
Date of Award: 2004
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Abstract:
This thesis attempts to address the behavioural science/design 'applicability gap' problem currently concerning professional academics and researchers in landscape architecture and related disciplines. Building on research carried out by others, it attempts to gain further insight into the nature of the problem, how the gap specifically relates to landscape design, how it manifests itself in the design process, and how the problem might realistically be addressed. It is argued that in order to address the gap problem in landscape architecture, it is also necessary to address the wider problem of the lack of communication and understanding between research and design spheres. Therefore, the study is conducted from a combined research/design perspective. A critical review of the literature combined with project driven reflection -in- action analysis establishes a lack of compatibility of environment- behaviour theory, and its research methods, with the landscape designer's spatial approach. It is argued that there is a need for theory- building to facilitate the practical application of integrated spatial -behaviour analysis. As a result, a framework of spatial/behavioural compatible theories and concepts, and a set of practical tools and techniques, are conceptualised, and their application explored, for site survey analysis. The utility of the approach is demonstrated for embodying user needs evaluation within the design process and for providing a method for contextualising research. Finally, a shift in thinking is envisaged in which research and design approaches are reconciled.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.777369  DOI: Not available
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