Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.774344
Title: How the New Labour Government Third Way policies (1998-2010) and the delivery of the New Deal for Communities (NDC) regeneration programme impacted on participation in health care in an area-based initiative : a longitudinal study using action-learning research methodology in a New Deal for Communities Area Based Initiative
Author: Greenham, Felicity J.
ISNI:       0000 0004 7961 5488
Awarding Body: University of Bradford
Current Institution: University of Bradford
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
The research examines New Labour's Third Way policies and the impact New Deal for Communities (NDC) regeneration programme had on participation in health care. This longitudinal study (1998-2007) explores participatory joint working, welfare state, social capacity, health inequalities, citizen involvement and community capacity. It captures the experiences of local community and front-line workers whilst delivering the Health Focus Group (HFG) in the NDC programme. Using action learning reflection techniques, the study analyses a purposeful sample of 15 from the local community, front-line workers, and strategic respondents involved in the NDC health programme. The research demonstrated the NDC did increase participation, joint working and involvement of local actors 1998-2003. The importance of communication, leadership and relationships was recognised as an important catalyst for developing community governance models. The new action learning spaces initiated, designed and delivered 19 new models of joint local clinical, community and complementary health and well-being projects. In 2001, New Labour introduced public private finance initiatives with the Primary Care Trust (PCT) which conflicted with the local actors' involvement in the participatory joint decision-making. The reconfiguration of health and social care services and the new public health models introduced complex governance and monitoring models, further distancing the local actors from the process. Strategic staff changes in key governance positions also adversely affected the communication and trust established with local actors. The research concluded operational, tactical, and strategic alignment is necessary to maximise joint participation in decision-making.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.774344  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Community governance ; Social capacity ; Public health ; New Deal for Communities ; Participation ; Health inequalities ; New Labour ; Third Way policies ; Longitudinal study ; Action-learning
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