Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.771566
Title: The effects of performativity on the professional practice of principal teachers within a Scottish Secondary School
Author: Drummond, Angela J.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
The globalization of education has, in part, been responsible for the application of industrial market mechanisms to Scottish schools. Education is viewed as a "product", with both pupils and parents being regarded as "consumers". Within this market system, teachers are accountable for the quality of the "product", measured by the performance of pupils in external examinations. Performance management practices such as development planning, self evaluation, analysis of examination data, and career review have been introduced into Scottish schools following the introduction of the Standards in Scottish schools Act 2000. Politicians hoped that the introduction of performance management practices would improve the professional performance of teachers, resulting in the improved performance of pupils. The influence of these market mechanisms and resulting quality assurance systems within Scottish schools is considered at three distinct levels, national, education authority and case study school. This research then attempts to discover how principal teachers, with responsibility for implementing performance management practices within their departments, feel about the effectiveness of these procedures in improving the learning experience of pupils. The interviews take place in May, and again in September of the school academic year 2007. The research also attempts to reveal whether "authentic" learning and teaching practices are being sacrificed for the demands of performance. A case study approach is pursued within a Scottish secondary school, which involves personal interviews with five principal teachers and the head teacher. The interviews are of sufficient depth to generate a high level of rich data for analysis using a content analysis approach. The minutes of the senior management team meetings from May 2007 -2008 provide a source of secondary data. The main themes arising from the research results are those of accountability, performance and management. Each is discussed in turn with the literature, and their impact within the case study school considered. In conclusion, the effectiveness of market mechanisms within the case study school is considered, leading towards the proposal of a new system of accountability. The results indicated that within the case study school, there was indeed a clear disjunction between "authentic" and "performance" practice amongst principal teachers. The demands of performance practices such as development planning, self evaluation, career review and examination data analysis within a hierarchal management structure was found to have a greater impact on subject principal teachers, than those responsible for pastoral care. The impact of Curriculum for Excellence on performativity is also considered.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ed.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.771566  DOI: Not available
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