Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.768912
Title: Study on hospital's smart lighting system (SLS) evaluation in Qatar
Author: Al-Zubaidi, Safaa Ali Talib
ISNI:       0000 0004 7655 8588
Awarding Body: Heriot-Watt University
Current Institution: Heriot-Watt University
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
This research examines the relationship between hospital lighting design and staff preferences with focus on visual performance and reduced energy consumption. A novel approach to hospital lighting design introduced by Philips (HealWell) was studied in a health care facility in Qatar. This Smart Lighting System combines both daylight elements and artificial light in order to maximize the benefit of daylight features, provides satisfactory lighting design solution and minimizes energy consumption. A mixed research method was utilized, which combines qualitative and quantitative methodologies, to combine both a detailed view of the meaning of the generalization of the concept under study and to enable a variety of techniques to be used in the research. These techniques including statistical analyses to investigate staff preferences for light through the use of surveys, which was followed by field experiments to test the hypothesis, to link it to reviewed literature, and finally provide a detailed analysis of the findings of this case study with conclusions drawn for hospital energy efficient lighting design in similar climates. The results revealed that when daylight was provided inside the hospital area through this Smart Lighting System, it was possible to improve visual comfort for occupants, and staff performance while increasing energy-efficiency. This solution can thus be considered for health care lighting design, in particular in hospitals that suffer from lack of daylight, i.e. in the countries where daylight is associated with high glare and high heat gain. Five published papers are included within this thesis in addition to the critical reviews for these published papers with particular attention given to lighting problems in hospitals, such as, visual comfort, energy efficient lighting design and the cost impact of lighting design.
Supervisor: Roaf, Sue Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.768912  DOI: Not available
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