Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.768323
Title: An assessment of the significance and social impact of the quarrying industry in Shropshire in the 19th and 20th centuries
Author: Galloway, Robert
ISNI:       0000 0004 7653 5044
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
An assessment of the significance and social impact of the quarrying industry in Shropshire in the 19th and 20th centuries Robert. S. Galloway This thesis investigates the technological innovations associated with the quarrying industry of Shropshire during the 19th and 20th centuries, from the extraction of rough-cut limestone, to greywacke used as road stone, sandstone flags found in vernacular buildings and finally to dimension stone. Examples of the minerals can be found in Shropshire, so such a breath of geology has made this county unique. Knowledge of geology and minerals is united in the quarrying industry. The inaccessibility and remote location of the raw materials has made the quarrying industry different from and other. The many methods of transport are also traced up to the 20th century. Access from remote locations to villages, towns and cities was very difficult. Britain's 18th century roads were made in form of causeways, constructed of stone and rubble, so narrow that only one horse-drawn cart could pass at a time. Eventually a network of roads spread across the country, enabling local and national economics to flourish. The quarrying industry, associated firstly with agriculture, rose to the ever-increasing needs of the industrial revolution by moving from manpower to machinery driven by stream.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.768323  DOI: Not available
Keywords: CC Archaeology ; GB Physical geography
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