Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.766881
Title: Conversion and transformation : Prince Albert's programme for a European monarchical order
Author: Jones, Charles Albert Muñoz
ISNI:       0000 0004 7656 7900
Awarding Body: University of St Andrews
Current Institution: University of St Andrews
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
This thesis will examine the political, legal, and philosophical beliefs of Albert, the Prince Consort, in the fields of governance, foreign policy and international affairs as well as the methods he used in his attempt to realise these ideas, both domestically and abroad. This "Albertine ambition" constituted a sophisticated and coherent political programme for a coordinated Conversion and Transformation during a period of rapid and profound socio-political change in Europe. His over-arching aim was to help to establish an integrated, co-operative and mutually supporting system of constitutional European monarchies. The absence of analyses of the prince's personal role as a prime mover in foreign affairs is a puzzling gap in the rich literature on Victorian politics. Although there are references to his accomplishments within this sphere, the overall coherence of his approach and the characteristic methods he employed to achieve them have been left under-explored, if not completely neglected. Additionally, the wider context of the topic allows for a further exploration of the continuing relevance of monarchy and dynastic networks in 19th-century politics especially in the realm of foreign affairs. This endeavour will ultimately show that Albert was a prolific multinational figure, or to use Johannes Paulmann's terminology, a "Royal International" who not only had the ambition to pursue his aims but also the creative ability and resources to do so.
Supervisor: Müller, Frank Lorenz Sponsor: Royal Historical Society ; Russell Trust ; Sir Richard Stapley Educational Trust
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.766881  DOI: Not available
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