Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.765549
Title: The emergence of social media networks and their impacts on professional journalism practices in Saudi Arabia
Author: Althiabi, Shaker
ISNI:       0000 0004 7661 0825
Awarding Body: Nottingham Trent University
Current Institution: Nottingham Trent University
Date of Award: 2017
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Abstract:
This thesis explores the emergence of social media networks and their impacts on professional journalism practices in Saudi Arabia, using two qualitative methods for its data collection. The methods of interviews and observation obtained from two emergent YouTube channels Sa7i and Telfaz11, and from series of journalists represent six traditional newspapers in Saudi Arabia. The main focus of this study is emergent YouTube channels in Saudi Arabia and how these channels, as new media organisations, or perhaps even new news organisations given the way that they blur politics and entertainment, place pressure on traditional media to create and adapt content that is more relevant to the under 30 generation that is so prominent in Saudi Arabia. This thesis also studies the impact of Twitter, which has given voice to many ordinary people and in turn has exerted pressure on newspapers and journalism practices to create content that bears a greater relation to everyday lived experience. The analysis and discussion of this study has divided into two main parts. First, YouTube channel content that has resulted in three main concerns: the use of satire; censorship and audiences engagement; and the impact on traditional media and professionalism. Second, the impact of Twitter on journalism practices which also resulted in three main concerns: policies and regulations; press freedom; and interaction and accountability. This thesis will argue that a digital public sphere is fractured and comprising of various layers that come together to create an overall dialogue within society. Therefore it argues that we need to think differently about what constitutes a public sphere in the digital age.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.765549  DOI: Not available
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