Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.765443
Title: Convex geometry in the characterisation of quantum resources
Author: Regula, Bartosz
ISNI:       0000 0004 7660 4724
Awarding Body: University of Nottingham
Current Institution: University of Nottingham
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
Various physical phenomena have found use as resources in quantum information processing tasks, and the study of their properties is necessary to provide optimal methods to harness their power. The thesis presents a series of results aiming to characterise the quantitative and operational aspects of general quantum resources, and in particular to establish methods applicable to a variety of resources and emphasise the similarities in their characterisation. Our approach relies on the underlying convex structure of quantum resource theories, employing techniques from convex analysis and optimisation to gain a better understanding of both the fundamental properties of quantum resources as well as our ability to manipulate them efficiently in information processing protocols such as resource distillation. The first part of the thesis introduces a unified framework for resource quantification, establishing general properties of arbitrary convex quantum resource theories and providing insight into the common structure of many physically relevant resources. The second part of the thesis deals with the convex optimisation problems involved in the operational characterisation of two representative quantum resources, quantum entanglement and quantum coherence, where we in particular establish a detailed description of their distillation under several classes of operations, and introduce methods for the interconversion between the two resources. In the final part, we employ geometric methods to characterise the quantification of entanglement measures based on polynomial invariants and apply the results to investigate the monogamy properties of multipartite entanglement.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.765443  DOI: Not available
Keywords: QA299 Analysis
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