Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.763135
Title: The impact of a lack of medical explanation for pain, 'medically unexplained' comorbid conditions, and ethnicity on CBT therapists' judgments of pain and treatment decisions
Author: Jones, B. F.
Awarding Body: UCL (University College London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2016
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Abstract:
This three-part thesis reviews the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapies for medically unexplained symptoms on healthcare use, investigates the impact of a lack of a medical explanation for pain, 'medically unexplained' comorbid conditions, and ethnicity on CBT therapists' judgments of pain and treatment decisions, and discusses the challenges that were faced in the conducting and reporting of this research. Part one of this volume is a review and meta-analysis of 16 randomised controlled trials of cognitive behavioural interventions for people with medically unexplained symptoms. Borderline significant effects were found for one analysis each of reduced healthcare contacts/resource use, as well as for medication use. There was no significant effect found for reduced medical investigations. Part two of this volume is an empirical study that investigates the impact of a lack of a medical explanation for pain, 'medically unexplained' comorbid conditions, and ethnicity on CBT therapists' judgments of pain and treatment decisions. Small, but significant effects were found for the impact of a lack of a medical explanation for pain and comorbid conditions on CBT therapists' estimations of pain severity and exaggeration. A large effect was found for the impact of comorbid conditions on estimations of pain being caused by a mental health problem. These factors were also found to have an impact on treatment decisions. No effect on pain judgments was found for the variable of ethnicity, but ethnicity was found to have an impact on treatment decisions. Part three is a critical appraisal of the literature review and research process as a whole. It contains some personal reflections on the different stages of research and the challenges that were faced.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.763135  DOI: Not available
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