Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.761065
Title: Audiovisual perception of Mandarin lexical tones
Author: Wang, Rui
ISNI:       0000 0004 7432 7305
Awarding Body: Bournemouth University
Current Institution: Bournemouth University
Date of Award: 2018
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Abstract:
It has been widely acknowledged that visual information from a talker’s face, mouth and lip movements plays an important role in speech perception of spoken languages. Visual information facilitates speech perception in audiovisual congruent condition and even alters speech perception in audiovisual incongruent condition. Audiovisual speech perception has been greatly researched in terms of consonants and vowels, and it has been thought that visual information from articulatory movements conveys phonetic information (e.g. place of articulation) that facilitates or changes speech perception. However, some research give rise to another type of visual information which conveys non-phonetic information (e.g. timing cue), affecting speech perception. The existence of these two types of visual information in audiovisual integration process suggests that there are two levels of audiovisual speech integration in different stages of processing. The studies in this dissertation focused on audiovisual perception of Mandarin lexical tones. The results of the experiments which employed behavioural and event-related potential measures provided evidence that visual information has an effect on auditory lexical tone perception. First, lexical tone perception benefits from adding visual information of corresponding articulatory movement. Second, the duration perception of lexical tones is changed by incongruent visual information. Moreover, the studies revealed that there are two types of visual information—timing (non-phonetic) cue and tone duration (phonetic/ tonetic) cue— involving in audiovisual integration process of Mandarin lexical tone. This finding further supports that audiovisual speech perception comprises non-phonetic and phonetic-specific levels of processing. Non-phonetic audiovisual integration could start in an early stage while phonetic-specific audiovisual integration could occur in a later stage of processing. Lexical tones have not been paid much attention in the research of audiovisual speech perception. The current studies fill the gap in the research of Mandarin lexical tone perception, and the findings from these experiments have important theoretical implications for audiovisual speech processing.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.761065  DOI: Not available
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